Pat Burns

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September 19, 2022 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Google Earth Engine Skills Training

 

If you plan to participate in the Google Earth Engine Skills Training, you must have a GEE account. It’s best to request an account a few days before the training. You can sign up HERE: https://earthengine.google.com/noncommercial/

 

Pat Burns

GEODE Lab

School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems

Northern Arizona University

 

Abstract

Petabytes of geospatial data are being collected/produced every day and cloud-computing services are enabling efficient global analyses. Google Earth Engine has been the leader in this realm for over a decade, with many analyses of high-impact societal issues. The Earth Engine platform combines Google's massive computing infrastructure with a vast and ever-growing geospatial data catalog. Most users interact with the platform using either the javascript or python API. In this technical session we'll focus on the interactive, web-based Code Editor which uses the javascript API. We'll work through a few example scripts that explain the fundamental data structures (Images, Features, Collections, Geometries, and Dictionaries) and commonly-used algorithms (filtering, reducing, mapping, and exporting). Lastly, we'll check out a few example Earth Engine Apps which can make complex datasets/code more accessible and impactful for non-experts.

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