Gyami Shrestha

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March 15, 2021 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

A U.S. History of Federal Collaborations around Carbon - Sustaining and Assessing Impactful Climate Change Research

The U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, established in 1999, has a mission to coordinate and facilitate federally funded carbon cycle research, and provide leadership to the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP)  on carbon cycle science priorities. The USGCRP, established in 1990, is mandated by Congress to 'assist the Nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change'. This talk will provide a historical overview of both programs, focusing on how we are facilitating interagency scientific endeavors toward seeking and enabling climate change solutions via interdisciplinary carbon cycle research. The Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2), a multiagency decadal science assessment will be highlighted. An overview of the federal carbon cycle and climate change research grants, fellowship and engagement opportunities will also be provided, in relation to the activities of the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program.

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    Offshore oil and natural gas platforms are responsible for about 30% of global oil and natural gas production. Despite the large share of global production there is little known about the greenhouse gas emissions from these production facilities. Given the lack of direct measurements, studies that seek to understand the greenhouse gas contribution of offshore oil and gas platforms are incredibly important. The use of airborne remote sensing to map greenhouse gases from onshore oil and gas infrastructure has become a prominent method to quantify and attribute large individual emissions to their sources. However, until now, this method has not been used offshore due to the lack of consistent reflected radiance over water bodies.  In this talk I will present the results from a 2021 study where we used visible/infrared imaging spectrometer data collected over the Gulf of Mexico to map methane emissions from shallow water offshore oil and natural gas platforms. I will discuss the methods we employed to map methane in the offshore environment and how that differs from the onshore environment. I will show how remote sensing can efficiently observe offshore infrastructure, quantify methane emissions, and attribute those emissions to specific infrastructure types.

    Bio

    Dr Alana Ayasse is a research scientist at Carbon Mapper and the University of Arizona. She earned her BA in Geography and Environmental Studies from UCLA and her PhD in Geography from UCSB. Her research focuses on improving remote sensing techniques to map methane and carbon dioxide plumes, understanding the role of satellites in a global carbon monitoring system, and using remote sensing data to further understand trends in carbon emissions.

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